Best way to fertilize potted fruit trees



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Best way to fertilize potted fruit trees?

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We have a 2 ton fruit tree (apples, peaches, etc) that we are going to put in a large pot for the winter. My question is, since we will be doing some transplanting once we have the tree in the pot, should we fertilize it for the winter to ensure that all of the root systems and roots for each tree is growing and strong? Or should we fertilize it with some sort of fertilizer that we give to the entire pot, to ensure that it is in the best possible shape when we begin to transplant in the spring? I don't want to waste money on a ton of fertilizer if it isn't going to help us much when we are trying to transplant.

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We bought an Inoculant last year and put it on our three year old apple trees which were in their first pot. We also added compost and fertilizer to the soil. A bit goes a long way.

We keep up with watering as necessary, but once the soil is bone dry we irrigate every two weeks or so. We just do not get enough rain.

Our tree got only about six or seven feet tall this year. I was trying to figure out what it would look like next spring. It is probably about the height it will ever get. So far the biggest and heaviest fruit we have this year was just below the branches this spring, as we just transplanted the tree.

However, we did have a couple of apples that were bigger than all the others and we had to pick them before they got too ripe because it was just too much work to ripen them.

The tree seems to be dormant now.

It's been through a lot and is ready for the winter.

At this time we are in Zone 7 so the soil isn't frozen.

We have one five gallon bucket of compost (total volume of three gallons) in each large pot.

We have put the fertilizer, or whatever other material we want to use, on the surface of the compost in the pot. The plants can root into it.

I would definitely fertilize the tree. I have five gallon buckets of all three fertilizers on hand, but I am getting organic products for free. We use some of the compost in the planter.

That is going to be the base of the pot. I may throw another bucket of compost over it, but I have not decided yet. I may be tempted to add a bit of soil.

I think I will add some compost, manure and a small amount of fertilizers for the next crop to the current crop. The tree is really starting to get established and is getting big roots and big limbs. We will give it another year or two.

I wish the compost would get bigger, stronger and healthy roots, so the trees would be stronger and more robust to the transplanting.

It's worth trying to raise some money to buy something to keep the tree healthy and robust, but even if I raise enough money to do that, I am not sure I would. I'm not doing it for the money. I would do it for the trees and to help other fruit growers. The cost of the materials is minimal. The cost of the labor is worth it to me. It is worth it to me to help another grower.

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If we fertilize it for the winter, will that slow down the transplanting? Or will it be fine? What do people do in this case?

When you go to transplant in the spring, that is when you fertilize.

What I do in the potting shop is once the fruit is established, I grow the roots on what ever substrate is in the pot, and they grow on the manure. I fertilize them. The big tree is established and has been fertilized for at least two years. The branch root and trunk roots have always been watered and fertilized.

We use compost and fertilizer. We have three or four apple trees and six pear trees.

We have to fertilize, but that is the only time we fertilize.

In all cases the trees are transplanted, so that is when we fertilize. We also use a product called Zone Do. It is potassium nitrate, nitrate of soda, potassium phosphate, fertilizer. We do not fertilize and have always had good crops.

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We bought an Inoculant last year and put it on our three year old apple trees which were in their first pot. We also added compost and fertilizer to the soil. A bit goes a long way.

We keep up with watering as necessary, but once the soil is bone dry we irrigate every two weeks or so. We just do not get enough rain.

Our tree got only about six or seven feet tall this year. I was trying to figure out what it would look like next spring. It is probably about the height it will ever get. So far the biggest and heaviest fruit we have this year was just below the branches this spring, as we just transplanted the tree.

However, we did have a couple of apples that were bigger than all the others and we had to pick them before they got too ripe because it was just too much work to ripen them.

The tree seems to be dormant now.

It's been through a lot and is ready for the winter.

At this time we are in Zone 7 so the soil isn't frozen.

We have one five gallon bucket of compost (total volume of three gallons) in each large pot.

We have put the fertilizer, or whatever other material we want to use, on the surface of the compost in the pot. The plants can root into it.

I would definitely fertilize the tree. I have five gallon buckets of all three fertilizers on hand, but I am getting organic products for free. We use some of



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